Superheroes and Dragons

Our Monkey Man is beautiful.

He spends his life dressed up as someone, or something, else. Our groceries were delivered on Monday, and he was dressed as Raphael from TMNT. When Jonathan got home yesterday, I glanced over to see him greeting a bouncing T-Rex. This morning Monkey Man has been a magician, complete with his new cape, lovingly made by Jonathan’s Aunt J. He is currently in his room, dressed up as a fireman.

You might say he has a flair for the dramatic. He is wildly emotional, and the expression of those emotions is quite over-the-top. I’m not talking about just negative emotions. You should have seen this boy’s eyes light up while he did his crazy dance (spinning in a circle, raising his knees out to the side above his hips, stomping his feet, sticking out his tongue, and pulling his hair straight up) this morning when I sang our new “Encourage each other and build each other up!” song. He follows his heart, and his heart has a huge capacity for expression!

He loves music, dance, and movement. That said, he does not enjoy exercise for exercise’s sake. He likes sledding and riding bikes and swimming, but if he has no reason to run, he won’t do it. He is particularly interested in gymnastics right now; he has been practicing cartwheels and head stands, and has actually gotten quite good.

He has an interest in all things larger-than-life. Superheroes, dragons, knights, and monsters hold his imagination captive. He lives in a world of danger and excitement; bravery is an everyday must. He imagines himself our strong protector, and one day he will make good on those promises (watch out, all you boys who may try to date my daughters!). Fear does not freeze him; it moves him to action. When Jonathan startles him during a game of chase, Monkey Man doesn’t cower and cry! He jumps to action, screams as loud as he can, and tries to startle Jonathan back! He keeps his wits about him in all circumstances, and he is reliable to do what is right to keep himself and his family safe.  He even has a toy dragon, which “hatched” out of an egg he received for Christmas. “Fire” accompanies him everywhere he goes, and Monkey Man even made a little bed for his dragon (the dragon sleeps on the top bunk). We are fortunate to have Fire and Monkey Man protecting our family and our home.

He enjoys listening to audiobooks or having me read aloud to him. He snuggles exceptionally well. He giggles at all the right parts and wishes he could be involved in the stories. He understands the deeper meanings and when asked about our reading, goes much further into it than just general retelling. He can express why and how characters show emotions, and he can make connections to his own life. This morning, for example, we were reading a version of “Beauty and the Beast” from Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book, when we stopped to discuss the Beast’s feelings as he walked away from Beauty after she refused to marry him each night. Monkey Man was able to identify the Beast’s sadness and explain that he was heartbroken because he loved Beauty and wanted to marry her, but she didn’t see that he would be a good match for her because she only saw that he was ugly. Monkey Man made sure to tell me that it shouldn’t matter to Beauty if the Beast is ugly or not. So wise for one so young.

His little hands are rugged and dexterous. They’re always super dry and warm. His nails are bitten all the way down, but he still manages to peel stickers off of everything. His hands were built for building. He loves to drive in screws and nails; he loves to bend wires around with pliers. He received a new toolbox with a bunch of real tools for Christmas; he hasn’t had much opportunity to use them yet, but I am planning an area of the garage that can be just for him. I plan to fill it with scrap lumber and some nails and screws so he can fiddle around and make some stuff. I’ll help him, of course, but eventually he will be able to take that on as his own.

And he has his daddy’s eyes. Giraffe eyes. Super long lashes, super white corneas, irises the color of moss on a log. His eyes just gleam and sparkle as he goes through his day: glinting with mischief, shining with glee, brimming with tears, crossing with silliness.

He is my most difficult child to parent. And my most easy child to love in that way that makes my heart break. Someday we will welcome his bride into our hearts, and he will no longer be my charge; he will be the leader of his very own family. I equally dread and anticipate that day. There are no words to convey the emotions and the joy that swim under the surface when I think about my son. So I will just say it again: my son is absolutely beautiful.

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